clean eating

What I Eat (almost) Everyday...

What I Eat (almost) Everyday...

Some people take instagram pics of their meals. I make a whole damn video about it. You asked and I delivered. Here's what goes into my body to fuel me through an entire day of cycling, spazzing, twerking, texting and spazzing. Breakfast. Lunch. Dinner. Snacks. And more snacks.

Polenta!

Squash-and-Eggplant-Casserole-af

I love to cook for myself. But I’m terrible at planning.  Being hungry by the time I start to cook means I want my food QUICK. This usually leads to eating a lot of cous-cous and polenta.   Both are super easy to prepare and give a welcome alternative to potatoes or pasta.

Polenta is cornmeal simmered in water or broth to create a thick, porridge-like, creamy mixture. The more finely ground the cornmeal, the creamier your cooked polenta will be. Try to find stone-ground whole grain cornmeal for your polenta recipes; it contains the entire grain of corn. If possible, avoid degerminated cornmeal; the process, which strips the grain of its germ layer, renders the cornmeal less nutritious.

One of my favorite ways to prepare it is topped with sauteed veggies, garlic, and onions.  Here’s a step by step:

1. Sautee onions and olive oil to a wok or pan

2. Add vegetable of choice: butternut squash, eggplant, zuchinni, peppers, etc all carry a nice flavor. Cover and leave the veggies to cook over a low to medium heat, until they are lightly tinged golden brown, about 10 minutes. At 10 minutes, add chopped garlic, so as to get the flavor but keeping it mostly raw (for maximum health benefits)

4. To prepare the polenta, bring water to a boil in a large saucepan over a high heat. Gradually whisk in the polenta (you want about 1/3 polenta to the amt of water) and continue whisking until the polenta absorbs all the liquid. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, stirring, until the polenta is thick, 5–10 minutes. Beat in the Parmesan cheese and oregano with seasoning to taste.

5. To serve, spoon the polenta onto plates or into large individual bowls. Top with vegetables. Optional cheese or chopped nuts or cracked pepper!

Gazpacho Recipe

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My client Brendan gave me his little trick to clean eating in the summer: Gazpacho. Great ideas lead to great bods.  Show us the way, Brendan!

Nothing beats gazpacho—a traditional summer soup from the Andalucia region of Spain—on a hot summer day.  Not only is it delicious, but

it’s super healthy, too!  Now, this isn’t a totally “authentic” version.  The real deal calls for day-old bread, but this is a great low-carb alternative.  For a thicker, chunkier gazpacho, coarsely chop up the veggies in a food processor as directed in the recipe.  If you prefer a creamy, more soupy version, throw it all together in a blender.

I will sometimes double all the ingredients and make a HUGE bowl that I can share with tons of friends.  Just remember: the more it sits in the refrigerator, the better it tastes!

1 hothouse cucumber, halved and seeded, but not peeled 2 red bell peppers, cored and seeded 4 plum tomatoes 1 red onion 3 garlic cloves, minced 23 ounces tomato juice (3 cups) 1/4 cup white wine vinegar 1/4 cup olive oil 1/2 tablespoon kosher salt 1 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper

Roughly chop the cucumbers, bell peppers, tomatoes, and red onions. Put each vegetable separately into a food processor and pulse until it is coarsely chopped.

After each vegetable is processed, combine them in a large non-metallic bowl and add the garlic, tomato juice, vinegar, olive oil, salt, and pepper. Mix well and chill before serving.  Ideally, let it sit overnight before serving.