nutrition

Speed Cooking - 5 min Meal by Kym"Nom"Stop

massage and squeeze

My job requires a lot of exercise and offers me very little time to myself. Because of this I've become a master of speed cooking! And I mean, of course, cooking healthy food quickly...not cooking on Adderall. Watch my video to see how to make 3 healthy dishes in 5 minutes:

  • Marinated Kale Salad  (if you have more time, check out this recipe: Autumn Kale Salad)
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Steamed Broccoli

What You'll Need:

  1. Kale
  2. Broccoli
  3. Sweet Potatoes
  4. Salt  & Pepper
  5. Lemon Juice (or half a lemon)
  6. Olive Oil
  7. Almonds
  8. A pot
  9. Steamer & some paper towels (optional- not necessary)
  10. 3 bowls (1 must be microwavable)

What To Do:

  1. Rinse kale & broccoli.
  2. Throw a few tablespoons of water into the pot and then insert the steamer.
  3. Cut up broccoli and place it on top of the steamer.
  4. Cover the pot and turn on high heat.
  5. Cut up your sweet potato into chunks and place into microwavable bowl.
  6. Cover bowl with damp paper towel.
  7. Place bowl into microwave for about 3 -5 minutes until soft.
  8. Squeeze dry the kale with a paper towel.
  9. Place kale into a bowl.
  10. Squeeze lemon, add a splash of olive oil onto the kale.
  11. Massage and squeeze the kale, then add some almonds.
  12. Salt & pepper the kale to taste.
  13. Once broccoli is bright green (2-3min!), remove and place into a bowl & season to taste.

I like to add some hot sauce to my broccoli or kale salad, and some peanut butter to my sweet potatoes, but it's not necessary.

These three dishes provide an assortment of protein; vitamins C, D, B6; iron; fiber; and a whole lot more good stuff! Kale is especially wonderful because it helps detoxify the liver - which is perfect for party people like me.

Kale Is The New Beef!

A friend of mine forwarded me a really interesting article from organicauthority.com, about my favorite leafy green, Kale! In the article they compare the nutritional benefits of Kale to Beef. Its no surprise to me, Kale is the clear winner. Read below for the proof!

1. Anti-Inlammatory: Inflammation is the number one cause of arthritis, heart disease and a number of autoimmune diseases, and is triggered by the consumption of animal products. Kale is an incredibly effective anti-inflammatory food, potentially preventing and even reversing these illnesses.

2. Iron: Despite the myth that vegetarians are anemic, the number of non-vegetarians with iron-deficiencies is on the rise. Per calorie, kale has more iron than beef.

3. Calcium: Dairy and beef both contain calcium, but the U.S. still has some of the highest rates of bone loss and osteoporosis in the world. Kale contains more calcium per calorie than milk (90 grams per serving) and is also better absorbed by the body than dairy.

4. Fiber: Like protein, fiber is a macronutrient, which means we need it every day. But many Americans don't eat nearly enough and the deficiency is linked to heart disease, digestive disorders and cancer. Protein-rich foods, like meat, contain little to no fiber. One serving of kale not only contains 5 percent of the recommended daily intake of fiber, but it also provides 2 grams of protein.

5. Omega Fatty Acids: Essential Omega fats play an important role in our health, unlike the saturated fats in meat. A serving of kale contains 121 mg of omega-3 fatty acids and 92.4 mg of omega-6 fatty acids.

6. Immunity: Superbugs and bacteria are a serious risk to our health. Many of these come as a result of factory farm meat, eggs and dairy products. Kale is an incredibly rich source of immune-boosting carotenoid and flavanoid antioxidants including vitamins A and C.

7. Sustainable: Kale grows to maturity in 55 to 60 days versus a cow raised for beef for an average of 18-24 months. Kale can grow in most climates and is relatively easy and low impact to grow at home or on a farm. To raise one pound of beef requires 16 pounds of grain, 11 times as much fossil fuel and more than 2,400 gallons of water.

Polenta!

Squash-and-Eggplant-Casserole-af

I love to cook for myself. But I’m terrible at planning.  Being hungry by the time I start to cook means I want my food QUICK. This usually leads to eating a lot of cous-cous and polenta.   Both are super easy to prepare and give a welcome alternative to potatoes or pasta.

Polenta is cornmeal simmered in water or broth to create a thick, porridge-like, creamy mixture. The more finely ground the cornmeal, the creamier your cooked polenta will be. Try to find stone-ground whole grain cornmeal for your polenta recipes; it contains the entire grain of corn. If possible, avoid degerminated cornmeal; the process, which strips the grain of its germ layer, renders the cornmeal less nutritious.

One of my favorite ways to prepare it is topped with sauteed veggies, garlic, and onions.  Here’s a step by step:

1. Sautee onions and olive oil to a wok or pan

2. Add vegetable of choice: butternut squash, eggplant, zuchinni, peppers, etc all carry a nice flavor. Cover and leave the veggies to cook over a low to medium heat, until they are lightly tinged golden brown, about 10 minutes. At 10 minutes, add chopped garlic, so as to get the flavor but keeping it mostly raw (for maximum health benefits)

4. To prepare the polenta, bring water to a boil in a large saucepan over a high heat. Gradually whisk in the polenta (you want about 1/3 polenta to the amt of water) and continue whisking until the polenta absorbs all the liquid. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, stirring, until the polenta is thick, 5–10 minutes. Beat in the Parmesan cheese and oregano with seasoning to taste.

5. To serve, spoon the polenta onto plates or into large individual bowls. Top with vegetables. Optional cheese or chopped nuts or cracked pepper!